What is the difference between radiocarbon dating and dendrochronology

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Analyzing the pattern of a tree's rings provides information about the environmental changes that took place during the period in which it was growing.

Matching the pattern in trees whose age is known to the pattern in wood found at an archaeological site can establish the age at which the wood was cut and thus the approximate date of the site.

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The rings are the cambium layer, a ring of cells that lie between the wood and bark and from which new bark and wood cells originate; each year a new cambium is created leaving the previous one in place.Radiocarbon dates which have been corrected--or rather, calibrated--by comparison to dendrochronological records are designated by abbreviations such as cal BP, or calibrated years before the present.See the cal BP discussion for additional information about radiocarbon calibration.Isotopes of a particular element have the same number of protons in their nucleus, but different numbers of neutrons.This means that although they are very similar chemically, they have different masses.

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